In the news!

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September is over all ready, and so is The People’s Library, which closed it’s doors yesterday after a packed month of readings and performances and digesting 113 books by Tasmanian authors.

I spent the last two weeks of the month feeling ill and sorry for myself, and almost a week of that unable to talk above a whisper, meaning I wasn’t actually able to read at the “Readings from The People’s Library” event my local writers group organised for authors from the North of the state (Thanks to Isabel who read for me).

However, we still had a wonderful time, and it was fantastic to hear from the works of the other authors who came along. Plus – we were in the newspaper!

 

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Publication!

Chronos

‘Undoing Life’s Choices’ is my first published sci-fi story, published in Chronos: An Anthology of Time Drabbles, available now through Amazon. 

Chronos is an anthology of drabbles (a story told in exactly one-hundred words) themed around time. Seventy-five talented authors from around the world come together to present ninety-eight stories of time, time travel, time zones, time manipulation, flash-forwards, space-time, time freezes, and so many other variations on the theme.

The stories are many and varied – ranging from dark and scary through to light and funny.

Most of my favourites are time travel stories – too many to mention really, but there is Future Tweak by R Daniel Lester, The Benefit of Hindsight by Douglas Prince, The Red-Nosed Man by I E Kneverday, Beyond the Known Future by Madison McSweeney, and Last Attempt by Jack Wolfe Frost. But there was also Surviving Seaglass by Sara Codair, in which the main character gets a glimpse of the past in every object she touches, Trying to Make a Living by Patrick Stahl, in which people are paid in time, not money, and Ten Minutes by Max Shepherd in which a clock’s flat battery saves his life.

 

An Event!

 

People's LIbrary event

Exciting news! If you are in Hobart, Tasmania, Australia, on the 8 September (next Saturday!) You could come along to the Salamanca Arts Centre and hear a snippet from my novella ‘What the Tide Brings’, alongside a wonderful tale from Isabel Shapcott’s collection of re-woven fairytales, and one of Pearl Maya’s short stories, many revolving around life in Outback Australia.

I’ve been busy…

I have two lots of exciting news to share this week.

Chronos

First, I had a 100 word story ‘Undoing Life’s Choices’ accepted for publication in ‘Chronos: An Anthology of Time Drabbles’, which is already available for pre-order here, and will be published on 10 September 2018.

I’m especially excited for this because two wonderful writers from my online writers group, Kelly Matsuura and Aislinn Batstone,  also have pieces in this anthology. So nice to be published alongside such wonderful writers! 🙂

 

AND!

 

People's Library - my book

I’ve been sitting on my other exciting news for a few months now: my novella ‘What the Tide Brings’ is being printed as part of The People’s Library project – in their words:

The People’s Library is a contemporary artwork with a uniquely Tasmanian library at its core. Over 150 authors bring this performance library to life through readings, discussions and live events. Join us throughout September where a groundswell of public telling awaits.

And what’s very exciting, and somehow synchronistic with my first piece of news, is that two of the terrific writers from my local writing group are also having their books printed as part of this great project; Pearl Maya, and Isabel Shapcott. And as this project is Tasmania wide, it includes other wonderful writers and friends of mine, Freya Su and Lee Morgan.

I’m so looking forward to seeing everyone’s work in print.

The website is now up (click here to check it out) so you can see all the authors involved, and if you’re going to be in Hobart at all during September, there’s a calendar on the page choc-full of events, so make sure you call into the Salamanca Arts Centre to see all the amazing stories by Tasmanian authors.

I’ll have more news about this in the upcoming weeks, so keep your eye out for more details. 😊

 

 

(And if you’d like to keep up with some extra behind-the-scenes information, please visit my Patreon page. For just $3 a month you’ll receive one story and some background details that accompany that story, as well as hearing my news before anyone else!)

Welcome

 

From Phone 003

My blog posts tend to be sporadic, coming in clumps and then none for months. If it’s been a while since I’ve posted, don’t worry, I’m most likely working on something, and will be back sooner or later with more news to share.

In the meantime, please enjoy my older posts, I’ve reviewed some wonderful books over the last couple of years – maybe you’ll find something you’d love!

#AWW Review; Songlines by Carolyn Denman

So last year I had the opportunity to read this amazing book. Below is an adaptation of my Amazon review:

Songlines

“Can you hear the river crying?”

Songlines was such an amazing, beautiful story, it gave me goosebumps! And so Australian. I loved the way the author has woven together strands from completely different cultures in such a way they work seamlessly together! This story has biblical, Aboriginal and fairy stories all merged into one believable explanation.

The only thing that jolted me out of the story occasionally were the sometimes unusual metaphors – though I loved this one “as helpful as a chihuahua rounding up cattle.”

Such a unique story, I’m really looking forward to the next one in the series!

(Which happens to be available now!)

Review – Egg and Spoon by Gregory Maguire

egg-and-spoon

Stars crown the world, she said, but the lights in your eyes, those are stars, too.

They make up your crown, he said.

I am no queen of anything.

Something too few of us know while we are alive, he told her. We are all crowned with glory. Peasants no less than kings.

Egg and Spoon is the story of two Russian girls – Elena, the peasant girl, who believes in Baba Yaga and the Firebird; and the wealthy and highly educated Ekaterina, Cat for short, who believes the Baba Yaga and the Firebird are foolish superstitions.

Elena is suffering alongside all the other Russian peasants, struggling to care for an ill mother after her father has died and her brothers have been dragged into service for the Baron and the Tsar respectively.

One day, a train stops in their village, unable to go forward due to a broken bridge. The train holds Ekaterina, on her way to St Petersberg to meet the godson of the Tsar.

Through a certain twisting of fate Elena ends up stuck on the train to St Petersberg, and Ekaterina ends up left behind in Miersk.

While Elena experiences a life beyond her wildest imaginings, so too does Ekaterina, who after fleeing Miersk finds herself in Baba Yaga’s cottage, being eyed-off as a tasty treat.

Overall the character of Baba Yaga sits a little closer to the side of kindly-grandmother than fearsome-hag (as I imagine her from the Vasalisa tale, from which I know her best), and yet I like this portrayal. Mostly the old hags have been misunderstood, after all.

Baba Yaga is, in her own words… “I am the larch root in the spring and the feverwort blossom in the fall. I am the forlorn echo in the dry community well. The tisane that can chase away the blues. I live in isolation for my own protection and for yours.”

Both Ekaterina and Elena end up in St Petersburgh, which is flooded, because the snows have not come, and winter has not been as cold as it usually is.

The challenge now is to discover why things are not as they should be.

While the style of writing is unusual – there is a narrator who is seperate from the story (though he does have a minor part), and who occasionally addresses the reader, this is a brilliant tale, full of snippets of wisdom.

I couldn’t recommend this more.