Book Review – Catching Teller Crow by Ambelimn Kwaymullina and Ezekiel Kwaymullina

Catching Teller Crow

 

There is so much to love about this story, and if I may be a bit geeky, the title is one of those things. It’s so clever, because while the title as a whole makes sense, each word in the title is also the name of a character.

Beth Teller is the first character we meet. She’s a ghost. She was killed in a car accident, and is hanging around because she doesn’t want to leave her father alone (her mother died when she was a baby). Her father is the only person who can see and hear her.

Beth’s father is a police officer, and together they are visiting a small town. A children’s home has burnt down and while all the children escaped, there is a dead body inside the building. It seems like a case of faulty wiring and bad luck, but as they delve deeper they find there is far more to the case than first meets the eye.

Isobel Catching is the other main character in this story. She was found wandering the river after the fire, and is considered to be a witness. Beth and her father try talking to Isobel, who tells them a strange strange story, about almost dying, and crossing into another world and having all her colours stolen.

Crow is a girl who Isobel meets in this other world, and who helps Isobel escape back into this world.

But there is far more to this story than meets the eye, and when everything clicks into place you realise exactly all the awful things that have been happening to Isobel, and exactly how it fits in to the fire in the children’s home, and the dead body inside.

On the surface, this is a crime/mystery, but underneath it is so much more. This is a story about stories, and how telling those stories, how being heard, can strengthen a person, and help in the healing process.

 

 

 

Review – Rivers of London by Ben Aaronovitch

Rivers

 

I have to thank one of the wonderful women in my local writers group for recommending this brilliant story!

Rivers of London follows probationary constable Peter Grant, who learns one night that he can see ghosts, when he tries to take a witness statement from one…

What follows is a brilliant story of the supernatural side of London.

There is a murderer on the loose, a spirit, able to infect people and set off a train of events that results in someone being violently murdered, while the person who carried out the murder completely unaware of exactly why they snapped and killed someone.

Meanwhile, Father Thames, and Mother Thames, both personifications of the great river that runs through the city, are having a disagreement, and their many children – all the smaller rivers and brooks and streams that run into the Thames, are involved.

Peter not only learns that magic is real, he learns how to wield it, his experiments (when he uses magic, his phone is destroyed, and he’s curious enough to try and figure out why) leading him to successfully summon a spirit with five calculators at the points of a pentagram, and a glow-stick instead of a candle.

Rivers of London is witty, and well written, a brilliant story line.